Author Topic: A flight in G-BMSB  (Read 475 times)

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Offline black-k1

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2019, 03:35:12 pm »
I knew it would be expensive but over two and a half grand? It is a once in a lifetime experience that puts a huge smile on your face but (I'd imagine) so would a threesome with two high class call girls and there'd likely be enough change for the taxi home afterwards.

I don't think I'll be doing either of the above any time soon!
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Offline Phmode

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2019, 05:08:45 pm »
You send your call girls home in a taxi? Now that's what I call class David  :D

Offline Matt

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2019, 05:48:28 pm »
Well, it's not outside the realms of possibility! Just less nandos for a while!

It's definitely on my list now, so thanks Tom!
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Offline gibbo

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #18 on: October 27, 2019, 09:15:04 am »
A great experience for you Tom. If I didn't get air sick, I'd consider it. May I ask the price of all this frivolity Tom?  :)
I'm not a big fan of aerobatics. When I did my PPL it took me a couple of days to get over the recovery from a spin, training. I don't know how I managed to drive home afterwards. We did a victory roll on the Spitfire flight and that was enough for me. You can ask for no aerobatics to take place.

The cost of my flight should have been £2,750 but I had a discount code which brought it down to £2,600. There are all sorts of extras which can be added on which push the costs up considerably. Things such as flying past the white cliffs of Dover or the Needles. I've flown a light aircraft past these many times and I had to draw the line costwise somewhere.
Years ago a friend of mine did a flight across the Bay of Biscay in Concorde. It cost him £500 and I thought he was mad. Now I really regret that I never took a flight in Concorde myself.

Last year I took flight in a Dragon Rapide. A tail dragger biplane with engines that I learnt to work on when I was an apprentice at Bristol Siddeley. I don't think that these will be flying for too much longer. Earlier in the year I took a flight in a Tiger Moth.

The Spitfire flight was an unforgettable experience and it took me ages to wipe the smile off my face. An opportunity to fly such an iconic aircraft will not be around for ever.


Well Tom, I'd have to say that was money well spent. You'd lose that kind of cash in depreciation within the first year of buying a brand new bike (probably more in some cases). I take my hat off to you Sir.  :)

Many, many years ago I attempted a weeks gliding course at Nympsfield in Glos. First time up the gliding instructor (I'll call him that for want of a better word) was obviously on some kind of ego trip. After we released the aero tow we were doing very tight turns to gain height. The horizon was literally spinning and at an angle I'd guess near 60 degrees. I just held down my breakfast, just!! Never went up again. I voiced my opinion of his actions and went home.  :(

Offline sudolea

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #19 on: October 27, 2019, 09:48:36 am »
...
The horizon was literally spinning and at an angle I'd guess near 60 degrees. I just held down my breakfast, just!! Never went up again. I voiced my opinion of his actions and went home.  :(

That's 2g's (a negligeable little less as you were climbing). Hard for a breakfast to pop out at double it's weight, it would seem at first   8)
I wonder indeed what's the purpose of making 2g turns. The instructor probably would say to remain in the raising air's bubble, but "solo tripping" is what you could most probably call it indeed...
On the other hand : 2g's is "only" what a MotoGP biker is experiencing at max lean angle.
There are I0 kinds of people : those who can count in binary, and those who can't...

Offline Phmode

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2019, 11:57:34 am »
A much more affordable 'big boy's toy' ride is to give Norman (Stormin47) a call and he'll let you drive his steam train, for free! At least, he did with me...

No g's involved but thousands of h.p.'s and no spinning horizons.

That was a day well spent on the Swanage Railway as my birthday treat to me a few years ago and all it cost was the price of Norm's lunch in the engine shed  :D

Offline gibbo

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2019, 08:57:43 am »
...
The horizon was literally spinning and at an angle I'd guess near 60 degrees. I just held down my breakfast, just!! Never went up again. I voiced my opinion of his actions and went home.  :(

That's 2g's (a negligeable little less as you were climbing). Hard for a breakfast to pop out at double it's weight, it would seem at first   8)
I wonder indeed what's the purpose of making 2g turns. The instructor probably would say to remain in the raising air's bubble, but "solo tripping" is what you could most probably call it indeed...
On the other hand : 2g's is "only" what a MotoGP biker is experiencing at max lean angle.

I believe he was trying to get a better view of the Severn Estuary and the bridge. We were already at 2K height when he released the tow but we had a strong thermal and he tried to take advantage of it. Whatever the g force was, I couldn't focus on anything and felt awful. This was my very first flight in a glider and I believe his macho actions was to scare the s**t out of us students. Surely, an instructor's job is to gain confidence in their students and not scare them witless.

Offline flatfour

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #22 on: October 28, 2019, 09:38:30 am »
Gibbo, it might well have had a lot to do with trying to extend your flight, although obviously it is important to ensure that the student is prepared for the manoeuvre and happy to try it before proceeding. It might also be that his natural instinct took over when he was given the opportunity of strong lift off the tow.

In all honesty I doubt that he was trying to frighten you or make you feel ill, it is counterproductive to the Club's interests as they are trying to attract new members from trial flights and anyone who is permitted to carry out these flights would be well aware of this. Having said that, many of those who are permitted to carry passengers for trial flights in gliders are not, in fact instructors but simply experienced solo pilots who have been given a passenger carrying rating.

At times, even well established power pilots feel disorientated in gliders. The constant steep thermal turns, coupled with a reclined seating position being contributory factors.

Offline S BMW

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2019, 09:15:44 pm »
Awesome. What an aircraft.

Offline gibbo

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #24 on: October 29, 2019, 09:29:44 am »
Gibbo, it might well have had a lot to do with trying to extend your flight, although obviously it is important to ensure that the student is prepared for the manoeuvre and happy to try it before proceeding. It might also be that his natural instinct took over when he was given the opportunity of strong lift off the tow.

In all honesty I doubt that he was trying to frighten you or make you feel ill, it is counterproductive to the Club's interests as they are trying to attract new members from trial flights and anyone who is permitted to carry out these flights would be well aware of this. Having said that, many of those who are permitted to carry passengers for trial flights in gliders are not, in fact instructors but simply experienced solo pilots who have been given a passenger carrying rating.

At times, even well established power pilots feel disorientated in gliders. The constant steep thermal turns, coupled with a reclined seating position being contributory factors.

Colin. There may be an element of truth in what you say but his bravado was excessive. You know the type, stood about like he owned the airfield, (hands on hips), always wore sunglasses even in dull weather so no eye contact, and talked in riddles when in the classroom. The fact that all of us were raw recruits didn't much matter. He was out to enjoy himself at our expense. I'll say no more on the matter.

Offline flatfour

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Re: A flight in G-BMSB
« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2019, 04:19:05 pm »
Gibbo I have seen a few like that over the years, although it's no way to promote the activity and hopefully they are soon weeded out. It should be a privilege to introduce potential new members to flight, not something to be taken lightly. They have paid good money, shown an interest and deserve better.

I do though believe that when a pilot is in the latter stages of training the dangers of things such as stall and spin are better conducted under controlled conditions, rather than the new pilot discovering them on a flight with passengers in situations like the final turn on approach!